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NFL needs to adapt the AFL’s overtime rules

Saturday night's playoff game between Arizona and Green Bay was epic. But the ensuing overtime period lasted just three plays and left something to be desired. So maybe now's a good time for the NFL to adopt the AFL's overtime rules.

Aaron Rodgers winning NFL MVP not shocking, but J.J. Watt was more deserving

If you ask me who should win the MVP, I, like so many other people, would say that the award should go to Houston Texans defensive lineman J.J. Watt, despite the fact that his team didn't quite end up in the postseason.

Despite needing comeback, Seahawks will be stiff challenge for Patriots

After needing a dramatic comeback with a fair share of help from their opponents and the New England Patriots completely destroying the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC title game, it would be easy to think that Super Bowl XLIX in Arizona will be a blowout. But we've learned anything from these Seahawks before, it's to never quite count them out.

Appeal ruling fine, but Suh has earned ‘Bad Boy’ reputation

Suh deserved to win his appeal. While it looked bad on television, simply stepping on someone, and now stomping with force, is the least worrisome attack a player can do in a football game. But in the same breath, Suh has certainly earned this reputation as a "bad boy" and "dirty" player in the league, which no doubt contributed to his original one-game suspension.

Cold weather football–the way football was meant to be played

The Frozen Tundra. The Ice Bowl. Many of the memorable games in NFL history have been played in cold and even frigid weather. The Cowboys-Dolphins game in 1993, famous for Leon Lett's gaffe which cost Dallas the game was played in the snow. The Ice Bowl, the 1967 NFL Championship Game was played in Green Bay where the temperature was 15 degrees below zero and the wind chill was anywhere between 36 and 48 degrees below zero. It's considered one of the best games in NFL history. Simply put, NFL football is made for the cold weather.

Threat of playoff blackout signals near end of attending NFL games

Television is way better than attending a live NFL game. Ten years ago, that statement would be absolutely absurd. There's no way that watching a game on television would match and surpass the experience of going to an NFL game, people would say. But last week, three teams faced the very real possibility of not being able to sell out their playoff tickets and having to blackout the game in their area because of NFL rules. Thankfully, either the remaining tickets were bought by fans or some corporate sponsor to avoid the blackout.